The Power Of “What If?” Questions

Your brain is malleable.

Your brain is malleable and, with it, so is your experience of both yourself and the world.

One of the best — and easiest — ways to transform your experience is to ask questions.

Transformative questions.

Transformative questions that presuppose abundance and possibility.

You will, by reading this brief essay, learn how to do so, through the act of asking “What If?” questions.

The Power Of “What If?” Questions

Some people say “Questions are keys”.

Keys to what?

Keys to new possibilities, new paths, new adventures, new perspectives, new concepts, new images; and so on and so forth, endlessly and infinitely.

If a regular question is a key, then “What If?” questions are both a key and a door.

Every “What If?” question contains, within itself, a pattern of thinking, imagining, and experiencing.

Each one of these patterns serves as a means of facilitating the ways in which you experience yourself and, in turn, the world.

A good “What If?” question serves as the gateway to powerful ways of experiencing who you are and the world that you exist within.

The right “What If?” question can be the key to fulfillment.

A poor “What If?” question serves as the gateway to restrictive ways of experiencing who you are and the world that you exist within.

Every “What If?” question contains, within itself, patterns that can serve as the key to either confinement or freedom.

Even more than that, though, the act of asking “What If?” questions is, in and of itself, a pattern.

A pattern that sculpts the neural-pathways in your brain.

Each one of these pathways serves to facilitate the ways in which you experience what you experience.

A set of pathways that revolve around asking “What If?” questions that presuppose failure and restriction can create assumptions that confine your limitless creative power and diminish the infinite treasures of our world.

A set of pathways that revolve around asking “What If?” questions that presuppose success and freedom can create assumptions that engage your limitless creative power and allow the infinite treasures of our world to come forth into your experience.

The right “What If?” questions are more powerful than we may ever know.

Your Brain Is Malleable

Right before we dive into the core concepts of this essay, let’s explore two simple truths.

Your brain is malleable. Thought is causative.

Your brain is magnificent.

A magnificent entity that contains pattern after pattern and pathway after pathway; seemingly ad infinitum.

Each one of these patterns and pathways serve as a means through which you define yourself and your experience of the world.

Everyone is unique — this is one of the most beautiful truths of our world — and, as a result, no one’s patterns or pathways are quite the same.

No one experiences themselves in quite the same way. No one experiences the world in quite the same way.

And yet, no one’s experience of themselves or the world is fixed.

Rather, our brains are so very magnificent that they can, through their own interactions with the patterns and pathways they are composed of, sculpt entirely new patterns and pathways.

The science of neuroplasticity is centered around the malleable nature of our brains.

Through the act of changing our thoughts, new patterns and pathways are born.

Our thoughts are, in this sense, causative, for they shape and reshape the structure of our brains.

Of course, there is far more to the science of neuroplasticity and the power of thought then the main ideas outlined above. But, for now, they get the point across.

You can change your thoughts — your habits of thinking — and, in turn, sculpt the patterns and pathways in your brain to align with the vision you wish to bring into fruition.

Sculpting the patterns and pathways in your brain, with intention and concentration, will transform the ways in which you experience yourself and, of course, the world around you.

Designing The Habit

Rather than concentrating on all of your habitual thoughts, though, you can concentrate on the “What If?” questions you ask.

Reshaping the “What If?” questions you ask serves as a way of bringing possibilities closer to you and giving yourself the freedom to see the infinite paths available to you.

Many of us — really, I’m only speaking for myself — ask “What If?” questions that presuppose failure, loss, limitation, regret, struggle, and suffering.

“What if I fail?” “What if I lose?” What if I really don’t know anything?” “What if I’m not good enough?” “What if I’m a loser?” “What if this is a silly dream that can never come true?”

The list is neverending.

For some of us — myself, specifically — these questions come automatically, right after considering a choice, a possibility, or a path.

Every question, of this sort, contains the presupposition that failure or struggle is, in some way, inevitable.

Engaging with these presuppositions as if they are the truth of what will happen is, in the end, a path to stagnation.

But, we can ask new “What If?” questions.

We can ask new “What If?” questions and reshape the presuppositions we engage with on a habitual basis.

Rather than engaging with presuppositions of failure and struggle, we can engage with presuppositions of success and abundance.

To reshape our brains, so that such presuppositions become second-nature, requires asking new “What If?” questions on a habitual basis.

You can ask new “What If?” questions with ease.

Just consider a particular possibility — anything at all, but if it’s something important to you, then that’s even better — and ask a question that presupposes something inspiring and exciting.

“What if I succeed?” “What if this leads to something profound?” “What if I’m far more skilled than I assume?” “What if there’s more to this situation than I’m seeing?” “What if I become the person I wish to be?” “What if this path leads to what I am looking for?”

Those are, in the end, somewhat poor examples.

But, the important thing isn’t to ask questions that fit into that exact mould.

The important thing is to ask questions that presuppose some form of success, abundance, possibility, inspiration, or possibility.

You can take a moment to ask these questions right now.

Let yourself be taken in by the sense of abundance and potential they arouse.

Let yourself engage with the assumptions contained within these assumptions.

Let yourself act in a way that acknowledges the infinite possibilities available to you.

Let yourself ask these questions on a habitual basis.

Let yourself ask these questions so very often, in a way that gives life to a new, more profound, way of experiencing who you are and the world you exist within.

Conclusion

Remember, the right questions are keys.

Take a moment to ask the right questions.

Do so as often as possible and, in doing so, everything about your world will shift.

The process may be quick. The process may be slow.

No matter what, though, you will grow in a way that serves you.

As always, if you would like to reach me, for any reason at all, you can do so at “maxwellcakin@gmail.com”.

Best wishes, and have a lovely day!

Hey! I’m Max! I Hope You Enjoy What You’re Reading, And If You Want To Reach Me For Any Reason At All, You Can Do So At “maxwellcakin@gmail.com”.