A Door In The Wall

Out of all the stories that H.G. Wells wrote, “The Door In The Wall” is my favorite.

Within the pages of “The Door In The Wall,” you can find a wealth of wisdom.

Wisdom that can aid you in living a rich, abundant, beautiful life.

A life abundant with all that you yearn for and all that you are.

Each one of these themes and concepts is rooted in Wells’ fascinating conception of imagination.

For these reasons — and various others, naturally — let’s dive into the story.

The Door In The Wall

“The Door In The Wall” concerns a protagonist who, one day, long ago, found a door in the wall.

A door in the wall of a remarkably mundane building.

Our protagonist walked through the door and, upon doing so, found himself in a garden.

A garden rich with flora and fauna; colors and vividity; life and energy.

Our protagonist is welcomed into this world by a kind, loving woman.

And, then, our protagonist begins to make new friends and play games of pure joy.

Soon enough, though, the experience ends.

Our protagonist is thrust out of this world and back into the world he came from.

A lonely world. A violent world.

Our protagonist attempts to share the world he visited, but no one believes him.

Our protagonist is beaten and ostracized for his belief in the world he visited.

And, then, our protagonist grows up.

Within the years that follow his childhood, our protagonist encounters the door in the wall several times.

Even though our protagonist, for many years, has yearned for the world behind the door in the wall, he chooses not to enter the door.

Rather, our protagonist is concerned with punctuality, with arriving on time to an important work function; with walking along the path given to him by others.

A path that fails to resonate but is said to be the “right path” or, perhaps, the “only path.”

Our protagonists yearning for the world behind the door in the wall begins to grow and grow.

For many days, our protagonist searches for the door in the wall.

And, then, he passes away.

Or, at least, that’s what the papers say.

But, perhaps, our protagonist was able to return to the world they once yearned for.

A world where they are loved. A world where they are cared for. A world where they are supported. A world where they are free. A world they are at peace.

Remember Who You Are; Remember What You Love

You are a creative being.

A creative being of power. A creative being of energy. A creative being of possibility.

And, well, quite a few other things.

Right within you, there is power.

You can use this power.

You can use the power that you are.

Your dreams. Your goals. Your ambitions. Your visions.

Each one of these is valid. Each one of these is worthy.

You can use what you are to live in the world.

To live in the world you wish to live in.

To live the life you wish to live.

To live as the one you wish to be.

And, within all of this, you are free to make a world.

To make a world you wish to live in.

To make a world you wish to be a part of.

Remember who you are.

Remember the power that you are. Remember the energy that you are, Remember the possibility that you are.

Remember this.

Remember what you love.

Remember what you love so very deeply.

Remember the love you wish to give.

Remember the passions and fascinations that compel you.

Remember the world you once yearned to live within.

Remember your dreams.

Remember the worlds within your dreams

Remember the gifts and blessings within your world.

Remember your capability to create such a world.

To live within your dreams.

To go beyond what appears to be.

To step into the one you truly are.

To live within the infinite gifts of our universe.

Our universe. Your universe.

Go Beyond Respectability

Our protagonist, in “The Door In The Wall,” is bound to respectability.

Rather than going through the door in the wall, later in life, our protagonist is bound to a career that he does not care for.

But, that’s not entirely true.

Rather, our protagonist is bound to the ways in which people see him.

To his reputation.

To a career path that fails to serve him.

To desires that are not his own.

To yearnings and obligations that are not his own.

To respectability.

To being seen as a “respectable” man.

To fitting in within the assumptions and judgements of others.

To the limits others have given him.

Rather than stepping through the door in the wall — the gift he has been yearning for all his life — our protagonist keeps on walking.

Out of fear. Out of uncertainty.

Out of the sense that honoring his heart’s yearning will condemn him.

Condemn him to the judgment of others.

To the loneliness that such judgements produce. To the shame that such judgements produce.

Right within these judgements, existing within the feelings and sensibilities that such judgements produce, there is an assumption.

A very powerful assumption that many of us exist within.

The assumption, in question, is that we are alone.

You are alone. I am alone.

We are alone.

Within this loneliness, we are weak.

We are weak. We are powerless. We are fragile.

And, yet, right beyond these judgements, beyond our own door in the wall, within the world that exists within our very essence, there is another assumption.

But, this assumption isn’t just an assumption; it is a truth.

The truth, you might say.

The truth, in question, is that we are loved.

We are loved. We are supported. We are connected.

We are strong. We are powerful. We are created.

Such truths serve as the foundation of our world.

Our world and your world.

The world that exists within.

The world that exists outside.

Our world.

And, in turn, your world.

Our role, within these truths, is to live.

To live.

To go beyond respectability. To go beyond convention. To go beyond safety.

To imagine great things. To go on great adventures. To be with wonderful people. To create wonderful things. To enjoy our passions.

And so on and so forth, without end and beyond measure.

Right within such a notion, there is another set of notions.

Our role, within this world, is to give.

To give of ourselves.

To share our worlds with others.

To share our creativity with others.

To share who we really are with others.

To really, really live and be and experience and share and give.

To be in this world.

To go beyond respectability, so as to live and give and experience and be.

Conclusion

Out of all the essays published on this blog, this one might be the most…experimental.

Sure, that’s one word for it. Maybe not the right word, but it works.

Beyond the rhythm and wording of this piece, there is a call to action.

Please, please, please honor who you are.

Please honor the dreams and visions and worlds and fantasies within you.

Please honor your passions.

Please share these with the world. And, if not the world, as that’s quite hard, those you love.

Please honor your yearnings and desires, even if they go beyond what is expected.

And, if nothing else, please, please remember who you are.

Remember the creativity that you are. Remember the power that you are. Remember the possibilities that you are.

Within such remembrances, you can find who you really are.

You can find who you really are and make your world.

Your world; our world.

Regardless of what you choose to do, thank you so much for reading this essay!

As always, if you wish to reach me, you can do so at “maxwellcakin@gmail.com.”

Best wishes, and have a lovely day!

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Hey! I’m Max! I Hope You Enjoy What You’re Reading, And If You Want To Reach Me For Any Reason At All, You Can Do So At “maxwellcakin@gmail.com”.

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Maxwell Akin

Hey! I’m Max! I Hope You Enjoy What You’re Reading, And If You Want To Reach Me For Any Reason At All, You Can Do So At “maxwellcakin@gmail.com”.